Core Ways Of Knowing

In addition to the core’s foundations courses, students must take an additional 18 semester hours, selecting 3 semester hours from each of the following six ways of knowing categories. * At least 9 sem. hrs. must be from outside of the student’s major. 

Aesthetic & Performance (3 s.h.)

Aesthetic and performance inquiry demonstrates to students that some forms of knowledge are best understood through intuitive, imaginative, creative, and interpretive methodologies in which maker and receiver come to insight and understanding. It affirms that the ability to understand and discern the world around us and our place within it is conditioned not only by the intellect, but also by the senses—the science of sensory knowledge and the appreciation of the beautiful playing a critical role in human experience. It teaches students that the aesthetic dimension of life ensures meaning and value in ways distinct from rationalism, pragmatism, and mechanism. Experiencing and reflecting on an art form cultivates abilities that can enhance and be valuably applied to other ways of learning and modes of inquiry.

  • ART 181: Visual Foundations I
  • ART 182: Visual Foundations II
  • ART 250: Foundations in Digital Design
  • ENGL 207: Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENGL 208: Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENGL 310: The Writing of Creative Non-Fiction
  • HKIN 342: Dance Explorations
  • MCOM 211: Introduction to Film Studies
  • MCOM 221: Digital Filmmaking I
  • MCOM 231: Fundamentals of Digital Design
  • MCOM 369: Adventures in Narrative Non-Fiction
  • MUSI 110: Fundamentals of Music
  • PHIL 370: Aesthetics
  • SAMC 111: Critical Issues in the Arts
  • SAMC 370: Aesthetics
  • THTR 130: Introduction to Theatre
  • THTR 161: Acting I-Foundations of Acting
  • any Music Ensembles
  • any Music Lessons

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Cultural & Linguistic (3 s.h.)

Cultural and linguistic inquiry opens the door to the development of a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioural skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a particular cultural context. Some aspects introduce students to languages and linguistic principles, enabling them to immerse themselves in cultural experiences and develop cultural intelligence. Others explore the value, importance, and uniqueness of Indigenous languages, which is an integral part of understanding Indigenous culture, knowledge, and worldview. This mode of inquiry engages students in questions of both cognitive and cultural complexity as they interact with different ethnic and social groups, with cultural studies focused on specific people groups, and with various modes of language acquisition. By moving from theoretical notions of culture to the experience of particular cultures, students gain insight into cultural differences from the perspectives of the cultures themselves. 

  • ANTH 210: Islamic Culture
  • ANTH 395: First Nations in Canada
  • EDUC 496: Indigenous Perspective in Education
  • ENGL 240: Indigenous Literature
  • ENGL 334: European Literature in Translation
  • ENGL 482: World Literature in English
  • GREE 235: Elementary New Testament Greek
  • HEBR 245: Elementary Biblical Hebrew
  • HIST 237: Genocide, Reconciliation and Co-existence: Indigenous Nationhood and Canada
  • IDIS 201: Indigenous People of Turtle Island
  • POLS 237: Co-Existence, Genocide, Reconciliation: Indigenous Nationhood and Canada
  • RELS 235: Elementary New Testament Greek
  • RELS 245: Elementary Biblical Hebrew
  • SOCI 395: Indigenous Peoples in Canada
  • any World Languages & Cultures course (CHIN, FREN, GERM, JAPA, RUSS, SPAN) 

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Experiential & Embodied (3 s.h.)

Experiential and embodied inquiry invites students to discover a new synthesis of knowledge through integrating theory and practical experience. This experience provides a bridge between traditional classroom study and field-based situations and transforms theoretical knowledge into knowledge in use. More specifically, students develop cognitive complexity by viewing subjects or situations not part of the regular curricular experience through a range of ways of knowing and being in the world. 

  • ART 305: Art Practicum
  • ART 306: Art Practicum
  • ART 307: Art Practicum
  • BIOL 316: Plant Ecology
  • BIOL 318: Tropical Botany
  • BIOL 362: Marine Ecology
  • BIOL 364: Coral Reef Ecology
  • BIOL 409: Thesis Preparation
  • BIOL 410: Senior Thesis
  • BIOT 100: Biotechnology Practicum
  • BIOT 200: Biotechnology Practica II
  • BIOT 300: Biotechnology Practica III
  • BIOT 400: Biotechnology Practica IV
  • BIOT 409: Thesis Preparation
  • BIOT 410: Senior Thesis
  • BUSI 395 & BUSI 396: Business in the Global Market
  • BUSI 49x: Integrated Group Project
  • CHEM 409: Thesis Preparation
  • CHEM 410: Senior Thesis
  • CMPT 409: Thesis Preparation
  • CMPT 410: Senior Thesis
  • EDUC 302: Initial Classroom Experience
  • EDUC 303: Initial Classroom Experience
  • EDUC 402: Initial Classroom Experience
  • EDUC 403: Initial Classroom Experience
  • GENV 131: Global Environment Issues
  • GENV 316: Plant Ecology
  • GENV 318: Tropical Botany
  • GENV 372, 373: Internship/Practicum
  • GENV 374, 375: Environmental Studies Internship
  • GENV 409: Thesis Preparation
  • GENV 410: Senior Thesis
  • HIST 310: History in Practice
  • HIST 315: History Practicum
  • HIST 316: History Practicum
  • HKIN 201: Strength and Conditioning
  • HKIN 202: Total Fitness for Women
  • HKIN 216: Journey: a TWU Outdoor Experience
  • HKIN 235: Climbing Pursuits
  • HKIN 355: Core Teaching Experience I
  • HKIN 455: Core Teaching Experience II
  • HKIN 456: Core Teaching Experience III
  • HKIN 457: Coaching Experience
  • HKIN 458: Approved Leadership Experience I
  • HKIN 459: Sport and Leisure Management Experience
  • HKIN 460: Sport and Leisure Management Experience
  • MATH 409: Thesis Preparation
  • MATH 410: Senior Thesis
  • MCOM 281: Public Speaking
  • MCOM 391: Communication Practicum
  • MCOM 392: Communication Practicum
  • MCOM 393: Communication Practicum
  • NURS 213: Clinical Practice: Adult Health I
  • POLS 395: LLC Internship
  • POLS 396: LLC Internship
  • PSYC 322: Research Methods
  • PSYC 497: Senior Thesis
  • PSYC 498: Senior Thesis
  • SOCI 320: Practicum I
  • SOCI 411: Practicum
  • SOCI 420: Practicum
  • THTR 101: Production
  • THTR 102: Production
  • THTR 151: Mainstage
  • THTR 152: Mainstage
  • THTR 153: Ensemble
  • THTR 154: Ensemble
  • THTR 175: Voice and Movement I
  • THTR 210: Technical Theatre
  • THTR 301: Production
  • THTR 302: Production
  • THTR 351: Mainstage
  • THTR 352: Mainstage
  • THTR 353: Ensemble
  • THTR 354: Ensemble
  • any HKIN Activity course
  • any Travel Study

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Historical & Archival (3 s.h.)

Historical and archival inquiry instils in students the knowledge that to understand the present and prepare for the future, they must first come to terms with the past by engaging in methodical research of archival documents and artifacts. In training students to grasp the intimate relation between past events, present circumstances, and future possibilities, this mode of inquiry equips them to be engaged, socially responsible citizens. It also teaches students that all accounts of past events are shaped by the interpretive practices of the historian, enabling them to detect and interrogate the ideological dimension of historiography.  

  • ART 237: History of Western Art
  • ART 238: History of Western Art II
  • ECON 306: History of Economic Thought
  • GENV 312: Wilderness, Water, and Global Warming: Canadian Environmental History
  • HIST 107: World History to 1750: Ancient to Early Modern
  • HIST 108: World History from 1750 to 1945: Early Modern to Contemporary
  • HIST 109: World History Since 1945
  • HIST 111: History of Western Civilization
  • HIST 112: History of Western Civilization
  • HIST 135: Globalization, Co-Existence, and Identity
  • HIST 136: All My Relations: Canada and the World after 1867
  • HIST 230: History of Nursing
  • HIST 251, 252: History of the United States of America
  • HIST 306: History of Economic Thought
  • HIST 312: Science and Technology in Global Perspective
  • HIST 391: Canadian Governmental Leadership
  • MUSI 131: Music History from 1600 -1800
  • MUSI 132: Music History from 1800 to Present
  • NURS 230: History of Nursing
  • PHIL 203: Ancient Greek Wisdom
  • PHIL 314: Reason and the Enlightenment
  • PHIL 421: Postmodern Philosophy
  • POLS 391: Canadian Governmental Leadership
  • PSYC 408: History and Systems of Psychology
  • RELS 320: Dead Sea Scrolls
  • RELS 351: Life and Teaching of Jesus
  • RELS 352: Life and Letters of Paul
  • RELS 475: Christianity and Culture
  • SAMC 112: Interdisciplinary History of Western Arts
  • SOCI 391: Canadian Governmental Leadership
  • THTR 331: Theatre History I: Origins to 1660
  • THTR 332: Theatre History II: 1660 to Present

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Quantitative & Computational (3 s.h.)

Quantitative and computational inquiry prepares students to develop a way of thinking about the world that is mathematical in nature. This mode of inquiry covers a broad array of subject areas that involve mathematical objects ranging from numbers to more abstract objects, such as functions. In abstract fields, students extend their quantitative and computational abilities in theoretical frameworks. In more applied areas, students learn to model problem solutions using mathematical and/or computing notations. They learn to analyze quantitative information, conduct computational analyses to answer meaningful questions, make judgments based on quantitative data, and communicate the results of that work for various purposes and audiences. In some cases, this mode of inquiry may be realized within an empirical context.  

  • BUSI 176: Introduction to Business Research and Decision Making
  • BUSI 275: Business Statistics
  • CHEM 104: General Chemistry II
  • CHEM 112: Principles of Chemistry II
  • CMPT 140: Introduction to Computing Science and Programming
  • DATA 100: Elementary Data Science
  • ECON 176: Business Research & Decision Making
  • ECON 275: Business Statistics
  • GENV 282: Geographic Information Systems
  • GENV 382: Applied Geographic Information Systems
  • GENV 383: Geographic Data Analysis
  • MATH 102: Introduction to Probability and Statistics
  • MATH 108: Statistics for Health Students
  • MATH 123: Calculus I
  • MATH 150: Introduction to Discrete Math
  • MATH 190: Mathematics for Elementary Teachers
  • MATH 191: Mathematics, History, Culture
  • PHYS 112: Fundamentals of Physics II
  • PSYC 207: Data Analysis
  • SOCS 305: Research Methods in the Social Sciences

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Social & Global (3 s.h.)

Social and global inquiry will provide theoretical and practical frameworks from which students can explore social and global issues. It will also sensitize them to the needs of the society around them and provide tools for engagement and leadership development in local, national, and global contexts. Encouraging students to appreciate the reality of human interconnectedness and uniqueness inspires them to become responsible persons, motivated by a caring Christian consciousness of the dignity and rights of all persons and of the need for strong, peaceful, and respectful relationships with all others in order to contribute positively to society and the world. 

  • ANTH 101: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH 302: Cross Cultural Communication
  • BUSI 311: Global Issues in Business
  • ECON 311: Global Issues in Business
  • ECON 354: Geography of the World Economy
  • EDUC 345: Gender and Education
  • EDUC 365: Social Issues in Education
  • ENGL 348: World Drama
  • GENV 111: Human Geography and Global Change
  • GENV 212: Urbanization Issues of Developing Countries
  • GENV 322: Global Climate Change
  • GENV 354: Geography of the World Economy
  • LING 101: Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 210: Language and Society
  • LING 302: Cross Cultural Communications
  • MCOM 111: Introduction to Mass Communication
  • MCOM 171: Introduction to Communication
  • MCOM 251: Introduction to Journalism
  • MCOM 313: Social Media: Theory & Practice
  • MCOM 315: Film History II
  • MCOM 317: Ethics, Morals, and Media
  • MCOM 372: Cross-cultural Communication
  • MCOM 491: Transformational Development and Leadership
  • NURS 227: Global Health, Humanitarian and Christian Missions
  • PHIL 108: Philosophy of Society and Law
  • PHIL 220: Philosophy of Sex and Gender
  • PHIL 310: Issues in Social Justice
  • PHIL 320: Social and Political Philosophy
  • POLS 101: Introduction to Political Thinking
  • POLS 211: International Politics
  • POLS 310: Issues in Social Justice
  • POLS 312: Globalization and Global Governance
  • POLS 320: Social and Political Philosophy
  • POLS 393: Law, Public Policy and Cultural Change
  • PSYC 399: Discover the European Psychologists
  • PHIL 220: Philosophy of Sex and Gender
  • RELS 271: Western World Religions
  • RELS 272: Eastern World Religions
  • RELS 285: Introduction to Missions
  • RELS 381: Contemporary Christianity
  • RELS 384: Religion, Contextualization, and Culture Change
  • RELS 386: Global Theologies
  • RELS 476: Christian World views in Historical and Cultural Context
  • SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology
  • THTR 348: World Drama

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